The 9 Graphic Design Tips All Non-Graphics Designers Need to Know and be carefull with

Posted 7 September 2018 by Kyereta Pius

1. Start with a great color palette

Ever notice that the best designs tend to have beautiful colors? That’s no accident. Choosing a great color palette is one of the keys to a great design. Give a visit to Graphics monsters Uganda pages and see it your self.

Now before you cringe at the thought of choosing your own colors, you don’t have to. Using a site like ColourLovers will give you access to millions of beautiful color palettes. Just find a hex code you like, and use it in your design.

2. Don’t get carried away with fonts

Ideally, you want to limit yourself to 1 or 2 fonts. This keeps you from having to worry about tons of combinations. If you’re going to use multiple fonts, use one for the header and another for the body.


3. Have a “Swipe File” This term comes from the copywriting world, but it’s equally applicable here. A “Swipe File” refers to instances of good copy that copywriters see. In our case, it’ll mean instances of good design that you see. Take those examples, store them somewhere (your computer, dropbox, etc.) and then bring them back when the time’s right. Provided you don’t rip off someone else in their entirety, there’s no shame in borrowing a little design brilliance.


4. Don’t be afraid to blank out No, not blank out in the sense of spacing out. Rather, don’t be afraid to leave blank, white space in your design. Sometimes, as they say, less really is more. Often designs get so cluttered that some white space with nothing occupying it will actually enhance the design. This may call for a bit of a mental adjustment on your part. But with the right change, you can use this simple concept to jump past seemingly “expert” designers. If you want a lesson in how to utilize white space, look at any marketing image created by Apple.

5. Align your objects This helps to keep design elements in a presentable order, regardless of their differing sizes. Proper alignment is an easy way to give your images a sophisticated and professional look. When dragging items in Snappa, grid lines will automatically appear making it super easy to line up objects.


6. Use icons to support your message Icons are like black pepper. They can be sprinkled on top of whatever design you’re cooking up. And the icons will add extra spice to your design, ensuring that it “tastes” great. We use icons quite extensively to reinforce the content of our blog posts. And if you want to learn from the masters, check out the Helpdesk blog for some more inspiration.


7. Follow your own design rules Rules, what rules? The ones you set for yourself. These probably won’t be specific rules. But rather cases across your design where you use a particular set of colors, lines, textures, etc. If you’re set on that choice, don’t turn around and do something contrary to it. Stay consistent with your “design rules”, to ensure consistency in your image overall.

8. Rinse and repeat If you’re working with multiple designs across an ad campaign, website, or other project – it may be easiest for you to just rinse and repeat. That is, copy your design and then just swap out the elements you need changed. That ensures the format is the same, even as you change the content.

9. Use font variants You can add plenty of variety, while still keeping things feeling consistent. The key is to use text from a single font “family”. An example of a font “family” would be Arial which has the basic Arial font, along with variants like Arial Black, Arial Narrow, and Arial Rounded MT Bold. These fonts all look different. Yet there is enough of a common thread between them that it will give a sense of consistency when used together in designs.

Post Comments

Rodgers Nsobya
March 19, 2019

Thanks so much Graphics Monsters in Uganda, i have liked and loved this article so much. I am a inspired young designer who wants to become at your level. Thanks

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Naks Belinda
September 19, 2019

This is a really touching one. Thanks Graphics monsters and your team. Most of the designers don't follow the basics and fundamentals or principles of design. They just do shady work

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